FAQ

  1. What is hearing aids?
    It is an electronic device that is used to help people with hearing problems to hear well. This worn-in-the-ear device will amplify sounds heard according to a person’s hearing level.
  2. 7 signs that you need hearing aids immediately?
    • You often misunderstand other people’s words.
    • Often asking others to repeat what they say.
    • Often asking others to speak loudly.
    • People around you hesitate to talk to you.
    • Your speech becomes unclear since you cannot hear your own voice.
    • Extremely dependent on lip reading to understand.
    • Always avoiding others because of the embarrassment every time you do not understand their words.
  3. 5 ways how hearing aids can change your life
    • You will be happier to hear sounds you are unable to hear before.
    • Your family and friends will be happier because they don’t have to use loud voice when talking to you.
    • Your confidence will increase when you are able to hear your own voice clearly.
    • You can enjoy music and television shows that you love.
    • You will be more confident about your safety when you go outside.
  4. Why should I use a hearing aid? Why can’t I just take some medication?
    It’s true that some types of hearing loss can be successfully treated after medical or surgical treatment. With adults, unfortunately, this only applies to 5-10% of cases. Many others have a permanent ear disease or damage of cells at the inner part of the ear. That’s why hearing aids will be recommended to help your everyday life.
  5. If I use hearing aids, can my hearing return to normal?

    Hearing aids do not restore hearing to normal hearing level nor cure hearing loss. Hearing aids is just a machine that amplifies sounds according to your hearing level. They can improve your hearing and listening abilities, and they can substantially improve your quality of life. Premium hearing aid has more sophisticated technology and is much resemble normal hearing.

  6. Which hearing aid will work best for me?

    The hearing aid that will work best for you depends on the kind and severity of your hearing loss. You and your audiologist should select a hearing aid that best suits your needs and lifestyle. Hearing aids work differently depending on the electronics used. This in turn will provide different features and sound quality for different hearing aids models. Similar to other equipment purchases, style and features affect cost.

  7. Can I order hearing aid through phone or internet?

    By working with an audiologist, you are purchasing professional care and services to ensure that the correct hearing aid is selected and that proper programming of the hearing aid is completed. Your hearing level will be obtained, your daily needs will be evaluated and your ear size will be measured. Our Audiologists are highly trained and will recommend the most appropriate hearing aid. If all of these processes are made online without proper examination, you will most likely not benefit from the hearing aid.

  8. Who is Audiologist and does Audiolab Sound have a license to sell hearing aids?

    An audiologist is a qualified hearing care professional who identifies and manages your hearing problems. Audiolab Sound has earned a certificate of recognition to distribute hearing aids in accordance with the Medical Devices Act 2012 (Act 737). You may refer to our Establishment License Number: KP73417134416.

  9. Should I use two hearing aids?

    We normally hear with two ears. Hearing with two ears helps us to localize sounds and assists in noisy settings. Most people with hearing loss in both ears can understand better with two aids than with one. If you have a hearing loss in both of your ears, two hearing aids are generally recommended because it will help you understand speech and locate where the sound is coming from.

  10. Is invisible hearing aids worn in the ear better than any other hearing aids?

    There are several styles of hearing aids. What is most important is that you purchase a hearing aid that accommodates your hearing loss and your listening needs. Just because your friend uses a particular hearing aid style does not mean you have to (or should) use that style. Your friend’s style of hearing aid may be a totally inappropriate prescription for your needs.

MYTH ABOUT HEARING LOSS

Myth Hearing aids restore hearing to normal hearing level.
Fact Hearing aids do not restore hearing to normal hearing level nor they cure hearing loss. They increase the intensity of external sounds which will in turn provide benefit and improvement in communication. They can improve your hearing and listening abilities, and they can substantially improve your quality of life.
Myth You can save time and money by buying hearing aids online or by mail order.
Fact By working with an audiologist, you are purchasing professional care and services to ensure that the correct hearing aid is selected and that proper programming of the hearing aid is completed Other professional care includes:

  • Hearing evaluation
  • Referral for medical treatment (if needed)
  • Hearing aid evaluation
  • Verification of fit of hearing aid
  • Instruction in how to properly use and maintain the hearing aid
  • Follow-up care and support
  • Repair services
  • Rehabilitation services
Myth A hearing aid will damage your hearing.
Fact A properly fitted and maintained hearing aid will not damage your hearing.
Myth A milder hearing loss is not bad enough for a hearing aid.
Fact Everyone’s hearing loss and listening needs are different. By working with your audiologist, you can determine if a hearing aid is needed and how much it will improve your hearing.
Myth Wearing two hearing aids is not necessary.
Fact We normally hear with two ears. Hearing with two ears helps us localize sounds and assists us in noisy settings Most people with hearing loss in both ears can understand better with two aids than with one.
Myth The invisible hearing aids worn in the ear are the best hearing aids to purchase.
Fact There are several styles of hearing aids. What is most important is that you purchase a hearing aid that accommodates your hearing loss and your listening needs. Just because your friend uses a particular hearing aid style does not mean you have to (or should) use that style. Your friend’s style of hearing aid may be a totally inappropriate prescription for your needs.

MYTH ABOUT HEARING AID

Myth Only a few people are truly hearing impaired; the statistics don’t apply to me or those close to me.
Fact With 28 million reporting hearing loss in the US alone, or one in 10 people, odds are good that you or someone you know is indeed affected by hearing loss—especially if you’re age 60.
Myth If I did have a hearing impairment, I’d certainly know about it.
Fact The truth is, hearing loss happens gradually and the signs are subtle at first. Sometimes our abilty to adapt make it hard for us to recognize the problem. A simple hearing test can help you gain insight, while professional screening can provide a more definitive answer.
Myth Hearing loss affects only elderly and is merely a sign of aging.
Fact Only 35% of people with hearing loss are older than age 64. There are close to six million people in the U.S. between the ages of 18 and 44 with hearing loss, and more than one million are school age. Hearing loss affects all age groups.
Myth It always can be improved by medical or surgical treatment.
Fact Many people know someone whose hearing improved after medical or surgical treatment. It’s true that some types of hearing loss can be successfully treated. With adults, unfortunately, this only applies to 5-10% of cases.
Myth Most hearing problems can’t be helped.
Fact 30 or 40 years ago, that was true. Today, 90% of hearing loss—the kind that’s brought on by age or exposure to noise—is very responsive to treatment in the form of technically advanced hearing instruments.
Myth I’ve been told I have a hearing loss – so I don’t need to bother protecting my ears from noises
Fact Just because you have a hearing loss doesn’t mean you should stop protecting your hearing from dangerous noise exposure. Regular exposure to harmful noise, even with a hearing loss, can result in more hearing damage.